wedding traditions around the world

wedding cake

Learning about wedding traditions can help you plan your wedding.

Even If you don’t have a wedding or special day coming up, you may still find differences in customs in other countries quite fascinating.

Wedding traditions range from the beautiful to the bizarre. Wearing a dress made from the bark of the mulberry tree could be beautiful or bizarre, depending on your opinion of tree bark. The ones I have picked for this article are three of the most beautiful, in my opinion.

from peru

This tradition is a fun twist on “tossing the bouquet”. Instead of using the bouquet catch to determine who will be the next bride, Peruvians use what's known as the “cake pull”.

Whoever is responsible for making the wedding cake must be involved. Charms are tucked between the layers of the cake and a long white ribbon is attached to each of the charms. All of the single female guests at the wedding choose a ribbon and pull. The one who gets the wedding ring charm will be the next bride. The ribbons make the cake look even lovelier.

from mexico

There are two Mexican traditions that I find particularly beautiful and symbolic. The first is for the groom to give the bride 13 gold coins at some point during or immediately prior to the ceremony. The 13 coins symbolize Christ and his apostles.

The second tradition is for the minister or priest to wrap a large rosary or a large band of flowers in a figure eight around the couple’s necks after the ceremony is concluded. This symbolizes their eternal unity, the figure 8 being a symbol for infinity or eternity.

from native americans

The wedding vases used in traditional Native American weddings are like two-spouted jugs. They can be quite beautiful and are often kept as keepsakes, displayed prominently in the new household.

The two spouts on the vase are on opposite sides. To end the ceremony, the couple drinks simultaneously; the bride drinking from one side, the groom from the other. The goal is to drink without spilling any of the liquid. This is symbolic of how the couple must learn to work together in everyday life with patience and harmony. This tradition can easily be added to any ceremony. It could also be a part of the reception.

The two spouts on the vase are on opposite sides. To end the ceremony, the couple drinks simultaneously; the bride drinking from one side, the groom from the other. The goal is to drink without spilling any of the liquid. This is symbolic of how the couple must learn to work together in everyday life with patience and harmony. This tradition can easily be added to any ceremony. It could also be a part of the reception.